Green Sandpiper

Green Sandpiper, Witgat, Waldwasserläufer, Pássaro-bique-bique, Andarríos Grande

Spotted in the Alentejo region of Portugal.                                 Green Sandpiper sound    

The Green Sandpiper (Tringa ochropus) is a small wader (shorebird) of the Old World. It represents an ancient lineage of the genus Tringa; its only close living relative is the Solitary Sandpiper (T. solitaria). They both have brown wings with little light dots and a delicate but contrasting neck and chest pattern. In addition, both species nest in trees, unlike most other scolopacids.

Green Sandpiper, Witgatje, Waldwasserläufer, Pássaro-bique-bique, Andarríos Grande

Given its basal position in Tringa, it is fairly unsurprising that suspected cases of hybridisation between this species and the Common Sandpiper (A. hypoleucos) of the sister genus Actitis have been reported.

This species is a somewhat plump wader with a dark greenish-brown back and wings, greyish head and breast and otherwise white underparts. The back is spotted white to varying extents, being maximal in the breeding adult, and less in winter and young birds. The legs and short bill are both dark green.

It is conspicuous and characteristically patterned in flight, with the wings dark above and below and a brilliant white rump. The latter feature reliably distinguishes it from the slightly smaller but otherwise very similar Solitary Sandpiper (T. solitaria) of North America.

In flight it has a characteristic three-note whistle.

It breeds across subarctic Europe and Asia and is a migratory bird, wintering in southern Europe and Asia, and tropical Africa. Food is small invertebrate items picked off the mud as this species works steadily around the edges of its chosen pond.

This is not a gregarious species, although sometimes small numbers congregate in suitable feeding areas. Green Sandpiper is very much a bird of freshwater, and is often found in sites too restricted for other waders, which tend to like a clear all-round view.

It lays 2–4 eggs in an old tree nest of another species, such as a Fieldfare (Turdus pilaris). The clutch takes about three weeks to hatch.

Other synonyms:

Afrikaans: Witgatruiter
Asturian: Andarríu Prietu, Mazaricu Prietu
Azerbeidzjaans: Qara trinqa
Bretons: Ar strelleg pastellek
Catalaans: Becassineta, Garsa de mar, Xivita
Catalan (Balears): Becassineta
Valencian: Garsa de mar
Tsjechisch: Vodouš kropenatý
Welsh: Pibydd gwyrdd, Pibydd gwyrdd y traeth
Deens: Svaleklire
Duits: Waldwasserlaeufer, Waldwasserläufer
Engels: Green Sandpiper
Esperanto: blankpuga tringo
Spaans: Andarrios grande, Andarríos Grande
Ests: Metstilder
Baskisch: Kuliska ilun, Kuliska iluna, Xivita
Fins: Metsäviklo
Faeröers: Flykrustelkur
Frans: Chevalier culblanc, Chevalier cul-blanc
Iers (Gaëlisch): Gobadán Glas
Schots (Gaëlisch): Luatharan Uaine
Galicisch: Bilurico alinegro, Xivita
Manx: Looyran mooar
Kroatisch: Crnokrila Prutka, Pjegava prutka
Hongaars: Erdei cankó
Indonesisch: Trinil Hijau
IJslands: Trjástelkur
Italiaans: Piro piro culbianco, Piro-piro culbianco
Japans: kusashigi, Kusa-shigi
Cornish: Pyber gwer
Latijn: Helodromas ocrophus, Helodromas ocropus, Totanus ochropus, Totanus ocropus, Tringa ochrophus, Tringa ochropus, Tringa ocrophus
Litouws: Brastinis tilvikas, Titilvikas
Maleis: Kedidi Pasir Hijau
Maltees: Swejda
Nederlands: Witgat, Witgatje
Noors: Skogsneppen, Skogsnipe
Pools: Brodziec samotny, Brodziec zóltonogi
Portugees: bique bique, Bique-bique, Maçarico-bique-bique, Pássaro-bique-bique, Perna-verde-fino
Romaans: Trintga da guaud
Schots: Luatharan uaine
Slovaaks: Kalužiak perlavý
Sloveens: pikasti martinec
Albanees: Qyrylyku këmbëpërhimë
Servisch: prudnik pijukavac
Zweeds: Skogssnäppa
Swahili: Chamchanga Kijani

 

 

 

Travel Birdwatching Holiday Alentejo, Vacation Portugal for birders to see birds on your trip. Guided Birdwatching Tours and Trips. 

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Guided Birdwatching in the Alentejo region of Portugal